Free Payday Loans Online Free Payday Loans Online

Archive for October, 2017

“GREED TRUMPED COMPLIANCE. IT’S AS SIMPLE AS THAT.”

The Washington Post, October 15, 2017: When you’re selling half a million pills to some pharmacy and you’re telling me that you don’t know what the rules are for a suspicious order?” said Geldhof, who is now working as a consultant to lawyers suing the (pharmaceutical) industry. “All we were looking for is a good-faith effort by these companies to do the right thing, and there was no good-faith effort. Greed always trumped compliance. It did every time. It was about money, and it’s as simple as that.” by Scott Highman and Lenny Bernstein 

My reflection: The Washington Post’s recent expose on the drug industry’s collusion with politicians to reduce regulations so opiates can flow more readily into the market is yet another glaring example of corruption and money reigning supreme. This is totally disgusting, unjustifiable and pathetic.

Today’s Promise to consider: When is enough, enough? How many kids have to die before our politicians and our society as a whole face the gravity of the situation of rising deaths by overdose. When will these young people get the help they need instead of being marginalized by those in power? MacAfee’s words ring in my ears, “Only when we take addiction out of the shadows and into the light can it be healed.” Kudos to the reporters who brought this story – out of the shadows and into the light.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/investigations/dea-drug-industry-congress/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.c50508dee7b4


“THE DEATHS JUST KEEP COMING”

A friend, who is a nurse practitioner in an intensive care unit, wrote to me, I had to tell another 20-year old that she was going to die. She had had three open-heart surgeries for endocarditis. She was denied a fourth. She continued to use IV heroin. Even as she died, she was seeking a high. The morphine wasn’t good enough; she wanted dilaudid. After I told her parents that she would not survive another surgery, she asked me if she was dying. I told her, “Yes, you are dying.” She took my hand and said, “Thank you.” She died the next day.

It is terrible and devastating and depressing. They just keep coming.

My reflection: I’m haunted by the girl’s relief at hearing she’s about to die – human life shaved of its vitality and hope, and at such a tender age. Life is not supposed to be like this.

Today’s Promise to consider: Addiction is now the leading cause of death among Americans under 50, with 64,000 overdoses last year nationwide – a 22% increase over the previous year. Every 19 minutes someone dies. My son once told me, “An addict isn’t afraid to die. An addict is afraid to go the next day without drugs.” Today, we all must work harder to reach these children before they give up hope. With compassion and love, we must work within our communities to reverse the sweeping tides of deaths.

 

 


IT’S EASY TO JUDGE

Two days ago, I saw this painting by Alessandro Allori (circa 1577), and I was struck by the theme of judgment, with a history dating back to John 8:7. This post isn’t about religion. What it is about are the words, He that is without sin among you, let him cast a first stone at her. As I examined the painting, both the contrite face of the adulteress and the look of tenderness in Christ’s eyes moved me. I wondered if it is human nature that we so easily sit in judgment of others? Is it human nature for those who are healthy to marginalize those who are not? Is it human nature for those who have never suffered from an addiction to condemn those who have?

My reflection: Before my son endured a 14-year addiction, I’m sure that I, too, judged others dealing with addiction. We need to use our judgment to make good choices, of course, but we also need to fortify ourselves with education, an understanding of issues unfamiliar to us, a strong moral compass, and solid principles.

Today’s Promise to consider: We know the negative words used to describe addicts. However, for those of us who love someone battling this disease, we also know the courage it takes for them to change their lives. We see the physical pain they endure to put down the drug that takes away their pain. We know their hearts are good because they are our sons, our daughters, our husbands and wives. They are our loves.


WE ARE NOT ALONE

Photo credit: Davood Madadpoor

A daughter of addicted parents wrote to me: I still struggle with the pain of what it’s like to live with and love addicts. I still struggle with issues of anger and despair over all of the ‘what if’s’ and ‘what could have been’s’ that circle around and around in my mind. But it is always cathartic to hear other people’s tales of their battles with this disease – whether they’re the addict or love someone who is.  It reminds me that I’m not alone.

My reflection: There are millions of us affected by this disease, either as addicts or those of us who love them. That’s why groups like AA and Al-Anon work. I found friendship and a lifeline in Al-Anon. In our mutual stories, I discovered compassion and support.

Today’s Promise to consider: It’s easy to forget that we are not alone. It’s easy to forget that many of us suffer from addiction’s grasp. Addiction is cloaked in shame, and the shame keeps us silent as we hold our family’s secret. Today, I will accept the help of others. In return, I will reach out my hand to help.


  • Translate

  • Weekly Meditations

    We'll send our meditations directly to your e-mail every week.
    * = required field

    powered by MailChimp!
  • The AddIct's Mom

    Magnolia
  •  
     
     Libby Cataldi - Stay Close. All Rights Reserved. Site Disclaimer | Powered by WordPress | Admin