AL-ANON AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUPS: WE’RE STRONGER TOGETHER

Family and friends

A mother wrote to me: I’ve been to many Al-Anon meetings and they were all terrible experiences. I came away feeling worse and even more hopeless. I know it takes a good fit, but I’ve never found one. Maybe I’m too old for the BS. I have no faith in therapy. I went to a counselor myself and it was a waste of time. A person’s mind is his own and no one else can do anything about it. 

My reflection: I went to three Al-Anon meetings before I found one where I felt comfortable. During the first two, I wept, buried my head in my lap, and never said a word. I left those meetings confused and defeated.

Today’s Promise to consider: Addiction wants to keep us consumed with feelings of shame and stigma, while it flourishes in the silence. When I finally found my home group, I knew I was surrounded by support and compassion, and I was safe to be vulnerable. Al-Anon became my lifeline. Continuing to reach out a hand for help takes courage, but today, I’ll remember that we’re stronger together.

 

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Pat Nichols
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Keep looking for a support group, it will make a world of difference in your journey. It is recommended that you attend at least six meetings before determining if a meeting is right for you or not. I attend a Families Anonymous (familiesanonymous.org) meeting each Monday. We have, on average, nineteen parents who attend. I could write a book on the importance of being a member.

Laurie
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Laurie

I, too, was reluctant to really engage in the early days of my alanon experience. The first time I went, I practically crawled in. Crying, crying, crying. But as time went on, I became aware of a distinct shift in my thinking and in my objectives for going. As I became stronger, I found I could actually help and encourage OTHERS! It was very rewarding to think that little ole me could turn my grief into actually being of service to a newcomer or to someone having a “relapse” (which I still do). . That’s when I knew I was… Read more »

Mindy Dahl
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Mindy Dahl

In have felt similar to the author of the post about feeling worse at the AL-ANON meetings when I attended. So I discontinued. My son has been sober for a year now, and I thought that meant my “journey of recovery” was complete. I just read the post as started crying. Think it’s time I seek a support group again.

Mindy Bartholomae
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Mindy Bartholomae

I found my way to a Families Anonymous group early on in my son’s addiction journey. But we had to move for my husband’s job so I wasn’t able to stick with my original group, which was fantastic, by the way. I did become a part of the FA online group which was wonderful. Even went to some of their conferences and met great friends. But I never truly embraced MY recovery until I hit my bottom, after yet another move, and through a local new friend, found my way to an AlAnon group that has become my home. This… Read more »

Diane
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Diane

I went to meetings on/off for 8 years but just never felt ready to take on a sponsor. At every meeting we were told that there are no “musts” in Al-Anon but then it would feel that having a sponsor was being shoved down my throat. Having a sponsor requires work, but with having a very demanding full-time job, I just could not get into the “work.” My alcoholics have all passed away, and I just wanted to go to meetings and learn the steps. I eventually dropped out because I was not comfortable having a sponsor. Recently, I ran… Read more »