REACHING FOR THE RED BALLOON: A LESSON FROM MY DAD

Yesterday was the thirteen anniversary of my dad’s death. He was a tough, Italian man, who fought for his country, his family and those he loved. He learned from an early age how to work hard and achieve his dreams. The photo above is of an oil painting he said represented his life. After serving in World War 2, he worked on the docks in New York City and his dreams were like the red balloon, high above him and out of reach. Through grit and determination, he eventually caught his balloon, teaching me that hope and tenacity are critical in overcoming adversity. I needed this lesson when addiction entered our home and took over my son.

My reflection: This painting hangs in our foyer and is a steady reminder that dedication and determination are essential for those of us whose loved ones are battling active addiction. We can’t give up hope.

Today’s Promise to consider: The red balloon represents a healthy life for my addicted loved one. Addiction tries to rob us of our dreams, but I will remain hopeful and stay the course with love and determination. I will continue to reach for the red balloon, stay strong and pray.

 

 

 

 

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14 Comments on "REACHING FOR THE RED BALLOON: A LESSON FROM MY DAD"

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Hetty
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Thank you as always. Do you know the name of the artist who made the painting and gave you hope? Hetty

shelley
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Libby, I just found you. I just received Stay Close yesterday. I have the last page opened on my desk, highlighted. “Hallelujah, Jeff will be different this time. Jeff will live and be productive. Yes, Jeff will live.” I insert Noah. He’s 19. “Hallelujah, Noah will be different this time. Noah will live and be productive. Yes, Noah will live.” Noah is Jeff, but he’s my second boy. Third in the birth order, boy girl boy girl. I’m almost done with my memoir. I would like St. Martins’ Press too. I met Brenda Copeland a year ago and I love… Read more »
Pat Nichols
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Enjoyed this post! It should give us all hope, we need hope. In addition and like your father, we must prepare ourselves for future battles with the disease. If not, it will destroy ever finding the red balloon.

Suzan
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Thanks Libby, it’s just what I needed to see this morning. I’m reminded of reading The Red Balloon children’s book to my kids, the little boy determined to catch an ever out of reach red balloon. My little boy, now 36, relapsed on meth yesterday, on my birthday. But now I see that red balloon and I will continue reaching for it with hope, fierce love, and faith. This morning I was up at dawn trying vainly to “meditate”,feeling so empty and alone. I rifled through a little drawer of mementos and found a photo of padre Pio. Looking at… Read more »
Ajia
Guest

Love the story about your Dad. I am sure he was a wonderful man and a great father. I am sure he was always proud of you and your boys. Miss you, my dear friend. ❤️

Nanci
Guest

Thank you so much, Libby, for sharing this beautiful meditation. I will never look at a red balloon the same way again. I am so grateful for your weekly meditations as they continue to teach me about love, hope, strength and the power of prayer.
Love,
Nanci