REDISCOVERING BEAUTY

A recovering alcoholic wrote to me: I just celebrated my three years of sobriety. What a day it was! My husband surprised me with a fabulous pair of very weathered, but beautifully hand-embroidered cowboy boots. I wear them almost every day (even if just while I’m making dinner!) in remembrance of the fact that something weathered by experience can indeed be beautiful again.

My reaction: The journey to sobriety is a hard-won victory, and I have great respect for those who have made this walk. Every day without alcohol or drugs is a success, and every month of living a drug-free life gives us hope. I learn from those who have traveled the road and fought to regain their life and freedom.

Today’s Promise to consider: Today, I reaffirm my faith that people can choose a better life, a different life, and a life of promise. I celebrate with all those who have found their sobriety, one day at a time. I, too, believe that something weathered by experience can indeed be beautiful again, and sometimes it can become even more beautiful than it was to begin with.

 

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Pat Nichols
Pat Nichols
9 years ago

“…and sometimes it can become even more beautiful than it was to begin with.” Yes, absolutely and what brings the beauty of recovery of our loved one’s to an even higher level is when we, the parent, fine our own recovery.

We all are changed by the disease of addiction but this change does not have to be a negative one.

Embrace the positive changes that can be made through the 12 step process of Al-Anon and Families Anonymous.

In prayer for all our children and our families.

Libby
Libby
9 years ago

Thanks, Pat, for seeing the strength of the quote for parents as well. Yes! We can become even better and stronger after the hard-fought journey to our recovery, serenity and faith. We, too, are weathered by experience and can be beautiful again. Blessings to all.

Barbara
Barbara
9 years ago

Thanks to all of you, I have found my recovery. Because of this forum, I have recovered from the isolation I felt when my son died. Thank you Libby, for your book, this website, and your compassion. Because of your compassion for addiction, we have this wonderful place to come and bear our souls.

With love,
Barbara

Libby
Libby
9 years ago

Our love to you, Barbara. You are an inspiration to many, especially me. You show us what compassion and courage look like. God bless you.

Susan
Susan
9 years ago

Thank you, Libby, for this: “As long as there is life, there is hope.” I have not been here for quite some time… The trials and tribulations of being the mother of a heroin drug addict, as most of us here know all to well, continue to overwhelm… Having said that, I am grateful that my son is still alive after 4 recent hospital stays in ICU.
I have no idea who authored the following, but did want to share… (Those of us here, unfortunately know all too well how true this is.) Sad. True. Still hopeful however – Not always easy – Not at all easy.

“Hello, my name is DRUGS – I destroy homes, tear families apart, take your children, and that’s just the start. I’m more costly than diamonds, more costly than gold, the sorrow I bring is a sight to behold. and if u need me, remember I’m easily found, I live all around you, in schools and in town. I live with the rich, I live with the poor, I live down the street, and maybe next door. My power is awesome; try me you’ll see, but if you do, you may NEVER break free. Just try me once and I might let you go, but try me twice, and I’ll own your soul. When I possess you, you’ll steal and you’ll lie. You do what you have to just to get high. The crimes you’ll commit, for my narcotic charms will be worth the pleasure you’ll feel in my arms. You’ll lie to your mother; you’ll steal from your dad, when you see their tears, you should feel sad. But you’ll forget your morals and how you were raised, I’ll be your conscience, I’ll teach you my way

I take kids from parents, and parents from kids, I turn people from god, and separate friends. I’ll take everything from you, your looks and your pride, I’ll be with you always, right by your side. You’ll give up everything… your family, your home… your friends, your money, then you’ll be alone. I’ll take and take, till you have nothing more to give. When I’m finished with you you’ll be lucky to live. If you try me be warned this is no game. If given the chance, I’ll drive you insane. I’ll ravish your body; I’ll control your mind. I’ll own you completely; your soul will be mine. The nightmares I’ll give you while lying in bed, the voices you’ll hear from inside your head, the sweats, the shakes, the visions you’ll see; I want you to know, these are all gifts from me, But then it’s too late, and you’ll know in your heart, that you are mine, and we shall not part. You’ll regret that you tried me, they always do, but you came to me, not I to you. You knew this would happen. Many times you were told, but you challenged my power, and chose to be bold. You could have said no, and just walked away, If you could live that day over, now what would you say? I’ll be your master; you will be my slave, I’ll even go with you, when you go to your grave. Now that you have met me, what will you do? Will you try me or not? Its all up to you. I can bring you more misery than words can tell. Come take my hand, LET ME LEAD YOU TO HELL.”

Libby
Libby
9 years ago

Dear Susan,

Thanks for writing and for sharing. Your son has recently been in the ICU four times, and I’m sorry. Those of us who contribute here know the pain of addiction, and we are here for you and for each other. You are not alone. Let’s keep each other and our sons in our prayers. Stay strong.

L

Barbara
Barbara
9 years ago

Dear Susan,

Thank you for sharing the poem. How true it all is. My son died from an overdose, but in my heart, I know he is with God. He was a good person and did good things, as well as bad things. Even though your poem states “let me lead you to hell” I don’t take that literally. Hell is where the addict is, while he is in active addiction. I get it….

I pray that your son never has to spend another day in ICU. I pray that he finds peace through recovery.

God bless you.

Love,
Barbara

Susan
Susan
9 years ago

Thank you, Libby and Barbara…

Barbara, yes, I totally agree; “hell” is being in active addiction… and having no peace. The “hell” caused by drugs – and ALL of the damage – that goes along with active addiction… that is definitely here on earth.

From my heart… Thank you, for your thoughts and prayers.

Susan