IN HONOR OF THEIR JOURNEY

IMG_0787 copyWhen you meet a clean drug addict

You meet a hero.

Their mortal enemy slumbers within them:

They can never outrun their disability.

They make their way through a world of drug abuse,

In an environment that does not understand them.

Society, puffed up with shameful ignorance,

Looks on them with contempt,

As if they were a second-class citizen


Because they dare to swim against the stream of drugs


But you must know:


No better people are made than this.

~Friedrich von Bodelschwingh 1831-1910

My reflection: Addicts are often considered second-class citizens, junkies, losers and scourges in the community. While it’s true that our loved ones in active addiction are not contributing to society, it’s also true that when they find the strength to live in sobriety, they return to life with a commitment to service, to help others and to make a difference.

Today’s Promise to consider: It takes courage for someone addicted to drugs to pick himself up and to change his life. It takes strength for him to live a life of abstinence. It takes grace for him to serve others and to give back. Today, when I meet a person in recovery, I’ll tip my hat in honor of his journey.

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Pat mugan
Pat mugan
6 years ago

I love, love, love this message! It is so heartwarming. My 26 yr. old son is in treatment now. This is so true. Thank you so much for these comments that are so, so true! I can’t wait to show it to him!!!

Ann
Ann
6 years ago

My husband and I just bailed our 22 year old son out of jail. He had been arrested in July and we choose to leave him in a “safe” environment. At the advice of our lawyer and my son’s desire we have taken him to his technically 4th rehab. As I hugged him good-bye I felt the bittersweet feelings of hope for a better life and concern that he can leave and relapse. Tears rolled down my cheeks as we left our only child in the hands of professionals far, far from home. I pray that he can fight the battle that is in front of him. I pray that he finds a recovering community he can call his own. I pray that he finds peace.I pray that he has courage to tackle his demons. I pray that he knows just how much his mom and dad love him. I know how I would like the story to play out but I have learned in the last 7 years that giving you to God is the only way through this. I pray He blesses you with the strength to keep on keeping on. I too honor those who work their recovery, for I know addiction is not what they would have chosen for themselves.

pat nichols
pat nichols
6 years ago

Libby stated that our addicted children are not contributing to society and this really made me think, with tongue in cheek, I believe our addicted children are vital to society. What would happen to the legal profession, the bail bond industry, insurance companies, counseling profession, prisons & county jails, handcuff manufacturers, treatment programs, medical profession, drug sniffing dogs and countless employees in numerous occupations that are directly or indirectly supported by addiction. I am certain that if there were suddenly a cure for addiction our economy would collapse.

Yes, when our children find recovery it is a beautiful experience. Addiction has taken so much from them and to see them struggle to overcome the numerous obstacles and then to gain their freedom back – words can’t express the amazement of recovery.